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Program

7 April - 18:00 h (Local Time)
St.-Bernward-Kirche Wolfsburg

Photo: Sebastian Bisch

THE APOCALYPSE

The Book of Revelation with Wolfram Koch

Content
Apocalyptic riders, war, plots and conflagration – all called forth by God's fury. Apocalypse of John, also known as the Book of Revelation, is fascinating for its fantastical visions of poetic beauty and expressive drama. As if in a fevered nightmare, humans and animals fuse, Heaven and Earth are aflame, while angels and heavenly creatures trumpet the forthcoming judgement over mankind's sins. The Apocalypse is a tale of destructive punishment for the world's depravity. At the same time, it is a complete upheaval that radically changes the existing Earthly structures. After this Last Judgement, all those on God's side enter a time of complete tranquillity and indescribable wonder in the new Jerusalem.

For two millennia, the Apocalypse kept Christians in perpetual fear, as countless church doorways and panel paintings demonstrate. To this day, it remains a source of inspiration for all manner of doomsday scenarios in everything from scientific discourse and social criticism, to adaptations in literature and film.

Author
The Book of Revelation is the last book of the New Testament. It is both a prophesy and an expression of hope. Its author wrote in the first person, addressing seven communities in Asia Minor and thus included the Christians oppressed within the Roman Empire. The author, who called himself John, was long thought to be the apostle John, Jesus' 'favourite disciple' and author of the Gospel of St. John. However, modern-day Bible students argue that linguistic and theological differences between the two texts cast doubt on, and possibly even rule out, this theory.

Actor
Wolfram Koch
has been solving crimes in Frankfurt alongside Margarita Broich in the Tatort series since 2015. Before that, he was a member of the ensemble at the Bochum Schauspielhaus. Since 2000, he has performed at the Schauspiel Frankfurt, the Volksbühne in Berlin, the Deutsches Theater Berlin, and the Burgtheater in Vienna in plays directed by Dimiter Gotscheff, Herbert Fritsch, and others. He is currently playing the title role in Shakespeare's Richard III directed by Jan Bosse at the Schauspiel Frankfurt. In 2015, he was awarded the Getrud Eysoldt Ring for his performance in Waiting for Godot at the Deutsche Theater. Two years later, he received the Grimme Prize for his leading role in the TV production Dead Man Working. In 2016, Herbert Fritsch staged The Apocalypse at the Volksbühne in Berlin with Wolfram Koch in the leading role. Koch is appearing at the Movimentos Festival with a reading of The Apocalypse. But he is no stranger to audiences in Wolfsburg. In 2016, he played in Rheinsberg, Ein Bilderbuch für Verliebte, and in 2017 he was in Die Wahrheit. Von den Vorteilen, sie zu verschweigen, und den Nachteilen, sie zu sagen.