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Program

5 to 7 April - 20:00 h (Local Time)
Kraftwerk

Photo: Matthias Leitzke

BALLET BC

5 -7 April 2018, 20:00h, KraftWerk
Introduction with Bernd Kaufmann and Jürgen Wilcke on 5 April at 19:15h in the KraftWerk

PROGRAMME

16+ a room (German premiere)
Choreography: Emily Molnar in cooperation with the Ballet BC dancers
Music: Arrangement and composition by Dirk P. Haubrich
Lighting design: Jordan Tuinman
Lighting direction: James Proudfoot
Costume design: Kate Burrows

Duration: approx. 26 minutes
World premiere: 17 October 2013, Ballet BC

16+ a room displays Emily Molnar's unique choreographic language through a complex study of time, transition, and stillness, where time becomes visible and the space between is as important as the space occupied. Set to a driving musical landscape by German composer Dirk Haubrich and inspired by the writings of Jeanette Winterson and Emily Dickinson, Molnar has created a dynamic world for 16 dancers where one is left with the feeling of both liberty and disappearance. The choreography possesses a formidable dynamic, with even motionless moments throbbing with an almost imperceptible tremor, a rhythmic trembling coursing through the bodies.

Bill
Choreography and costume design: Sharon Eyal & Gai Behar
Music and sound design: Ori Lichtik
Lighting design: Omer Sheizaf
Staged by: Osnat Kelner

Duration: approx. 30 minutes
World premiere: 5 May 2010, Batsheva Dance Company

The choreography Bill, a raw, intense mix of dance, music and design, creates a universe all its own. It showcases Sharon Eyal's and Gai Behar’s signature shifts from large group to smaller ensemble, which in turn morph into breathtaking solos. The piece requires dancers to perform intricate and precise movements; the human anatomy is audaciously exploited with bodies grotesquely twisting as if made out of rubber. And there is also an infectious gaiety about it, an impetuous, sensual pleasure in the body and its movement.

The production was created together with Eyal's and Behar's frequent collaborator Ori Lichtik. The piece celebrated its world premiere in 2010 with the Batsheva Dance Company; its debut with Ballet BC was in 2016.

Solo Echo
Choreography: Crystal Pite
Music: Johannes Brahms: Excerpts from two Sonatas for Cello and Piano: Allegro Non Troppo from op. 38 in E Minor and Adagio Affettuoso from op. 99 in F Major. /Yo-Yo Ma (cello) and Emanuel Ax (piano)
Set design: Jay Gower Taylor
Costume design: Crystal Pite and Joke Visser
Lighting design: Tom Visser
Staged by: Eric Beauchesne

Duration: approx. 20 minutes
World premiere: 29 February 2012, Nederlands Dans Theater

In Solo Echo, Crystal Pite continues her lifelong artistic exploration of tension and its resolution. The choreography is inspired by two sonatas for piano and cello by Johannes Brahms that have been pivotal for Crystal Pite in her creative practice, as well as the poem Lines for Winter by Mark Strand.

The Allegro from Opus 38 by Johannes Brahms expresses passion and exuberance, at times even an aggressive recklessness. Characteristics of youth, which have been transformed 20 years later in the Allegro from Brahm's Opus 99 into restraint and reflection.
Solo Echo shifts between aggression and longing, between the individual and the collective, on the path from conflict to reconciliation.

Total duration: approx. 1 hour 45 minutes, with two intermissions

Ballet BC is supported by the Canada Council for the Arts, BC Arts Council and by the Y. P. Heung Foundation

COMPANY
Based in Vancouver, Ballet BC is known for its diversity of style and technique and its daring and innovative choreographies. It pushes the frontiers of contemporary dance, without losing sight of the roots of classical ballet. The 20 dancers are trained in both classical ballet and contemporary dance and see themselves as open-minded and critical-thinking artists, each with a unique, demanding movement vocabulary of their own.
The company was founded in 1986 and is committed to developing and producing new contemporary dance pieces as well as training talented young dancers in Canada. Since 2009 it has expanded its international collaborations under the direction of Emily Molnar. The company's repertoire has since come to include a growing number of international choreographies dating from the late 20th century to the present day. More than 40 new productions have been created under the direction of Emily Molnar in cooperation with great international choreographers like William Forsythe, Cayetano Soto, Itzik Galili, Aszure Barton, Johan Inger, Wen Wei Wang and many more.

Ballet BC is now performing for the first time in Germany.

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND CHOREOGRAPHER
"Dance at its best is transformational. It can transform a city, a room, a person, a way of seeing things. Our commitment to creating dance and art is a clear manifestation of our unique conversation with all of you – our community," Emily Molnar says. Following her dance training, Ballet BC's Artistic Director and choreographer danced with the National Ballet of Canada and as a soloist with the Ballett Frankfurt under the direction of William Forsythe. She also began as a soloist with Ballet BC. After some time working and studying in Europe, Asia and the US, she was appointed the company's Artistic Director in 2009. Her most recent works for Ballet BC include 16+ a room, RITE and Keep Dreaming, I'm Driving.

Molnar sees herself as a mentor and trainer for dancers and choreographers. She promotes the study and development of dance and the role of the artist in society in general. In addition to her work with Ballet BC, Molnar is Artistic Director of the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity.

CHOREOGRAPHERS
The conflict between opposing ideas and forces is the fundamental concern of Canadian choreographer Crystal Pite. She deals with these by using an experimental dance language, often combining it with text, digital images and unusual musical forms. A former dancer with William Forsythe's Ballett Frankfurt, she made her choreographic debut in 1990 at Ballet BC. She is now in-house choreographer with Nederlands Dans Theater I (since 2008) and associate artist at Sadler's Wells, London (since 2013).

Pite's company Kidd Pivot, which she founded in Vancouver in 2002, had a residency at the Künstlerhaus Mousonturm in Frankfurt from 2010 to 2012. She has also created choreographies for the Cullberg Ballet, the Opéra national de Paris and the Royal Ballet at the London opera house. In 2015 she received the Laurence Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance.

Jerusalem-born Sharon Eyal came to the Israeli Batsheva Dance Company as a dancer in 1990 and served as its house choreographer from 2005 to 2012. Since 2009 she has created choreographies for companies including the Norwegian ensemble Carte Blanche – The Norwegian National Company of Contemporary Dance and, since 2013, for the Nederlands Dance Theater. In 2017 she was awarded the prestigious FEDORA Prize.

Music producer Gai Behar was born in Jerusalem and has organized multidisciplinary underground events. He has been working together with Sharon Eyal since 2005, with the two using the name L-E-V since 2013. They place their dancers in an artificial world in which classical ballet and rave culture converge.

The Nederlands Dans Theater I danced the choreography Salt Womb by Sharon Eyal and Gai Behar at the 2017 Movimentos Festival.